Senate Bill 4317
116th Congress(2019-2020)
SAFE TO WORK Act
Introduced
Introduced
Introduced in Senate on Jul 27, 2020
Overview
Text
Introduced
Jul 27, 2020
Latest Action
Jul 27, 2020
Origin Chamber
Senate
Type
Bill
Bill
The primary form of legislative measure used to propose law. Depending on the chamber of origin, bills begin with a designation of either H.R. or S. Joint resolution is another form of legislative measure used to propose law.
Bill Number
4317
Congress
116
Policy Area
Law
Law
Primary focus of measure is matters affecting civil actions and administrative remedies, courts and judicial administration, general constitutional issues, dispute resolution, including mediation and arbitration. Measures concerning specific constitutional amendments may fall under the policy area relevant to the subject matter of the amendment (e.g., Education). Measures concerning criminal procedure and law enforcement may fall under Crime and Law Enforcement policy area.
Sponsorship by Party
Texas
North Carolina
Indiana
Mississippi
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
North Dakota
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Arkansas
No Senate votes have been held for this bill.
Summary

Safeguarding America's Frontline Employees To Offer Work Opportunities Required to Kickstart the Economy Act or the SAFE TO WORK Act

This bill limits liability for injuries related to COVID-19 (i.e., coronavirus disease 2019).

Generally, an individual alleging harm from exposure to coronavirus or related medical treatment occurring before October 1, 2024, may sue only under the causes of action created by this bill, with limited exceptions. However, the bill does not preempt any law that imposes stricter limits on liability or otherwise provides greater protections to defendants.

An individual or entity engaged in business or other activities may be liable for injuries resulting from coronavirus exposure only if the plaintiff proves by clear and convincing evidence that (1) the defendant did not make reasonable efforts to comply with government standards and guidance, (2) the defendant's actions constitute gross negligence or willful misconduct, and (3) actual exposure caused the plaintiff's injury. (The clear and convincing evidence standard is a higher standard of proof than is typically required in a civil action.)

Similarly, a health care provider may be liable for injuries connected to coronavirus-related services only if the plaintiff proves by clear and convincing evidence that (1) the provider's actions constituted gross negligence or willful misconduct, and (2) such actions directly caused the injury.

The bill also contains various coronavirus-related protections for defendants, including protections that (1) exempt an employer or operator of public accommodations that meets certain requirements from liability under certain federal laws, (2) impose limitations on coronavirus-related class action lawsuits, and (3) limit liability for certain injuries related to workplace coronavirus testing.

Text (1)
Actions (2)
07/27/2020
Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.
07/27/2020
Introduced in Senate
Public Record
Created
Jul 28, 2020 4:27:07 AM
Updated
Feb 24, 2021 5:54:44 AM